If you wish to improve your golf game, you must receive proper instruction or coaching, and you must practice. There is no short cut, miracle cure, or easy way to do it, you must form and stick to a plan. Your plan depends on how much you wish to improve or how much time you have to dedicate to your game. In talking with your instructor you will be able to lay out a plan to fit your schedule and your ability to improve your skills to the level you wish to achieve. The following practice routine you could try at your golf course or range. Remember the stretching exercises from the last month’s article before you begin any practice session, because like playing you must be prepared for the first tee.

 

  1. For putting work from four different directions from the hole, practice ten times from each of two, four, six, eight, twelve and twenty feet.
  2. For chipping (not breaking the wrists) from three yards off the green try five chips with each of the 7-iron, 9-iron, and pitching wedge. Repeat this drill adding your sand wedge from six yards and ten yards.
  3. Short pitches (more wrist action) should be done with two or three wedges with five balls each and practice from 15, 20 and 25 yards.
  4. Longer pitches from 50, 60, and 70 yards use the wedges again trying five balls from each position.
  5. From a practice bunker play 30 shots from a variety of lies (plugged, down hill, up hill, etc.).
  6. Full swing practice by hitting 10 balls with each of your 9-iron, 7-iron, 5-iron, a fairway wood, and your driver.

 

Wow that is a lot of practicing! Yes it is; however, depending on how much you wish to improve depends on how much you will dedicate yourself to practicing. Take pieces from this and apply it to the time you have available and go from there. If you wish to see a noticeable improvement in your scores concentrate on the short game which is where you will be able to save the most shots.

 

Other practice thoughts and ideas you can use might be to play nine holes only using your 5-iron or 7-iron and a putter, trying to play to different targets than what you are use to. This can help your strategy and thought process while playing both for fun and maybe tournament play. You might even surprise yourself with a score that is close to what you shoot with a full set of clubs.

 

Remember if you wish to make a noticeable improvement to your game you must put forth the effort and seek out proper instruction, or take what you have been given and enjoy the game, I know I do!

 

For more other helpful hints your contact is Canadian PGA Golf Professional John Davis and the email address is jdavis@joshuacreek.ca .